Conferences

Annual Spring Conference

Preconference Workshops

Friday, April 26
8 am–5 pm                           

PR1: Point of Care Ultrasound for the Family Medicine Physician  (PART I)
Neil Jayasekera, MD; Kevin Bergman, MD; Mena Ramos, MD; Kendra Johnson; David Stromberg; Nicholas LeFevre, MD, Brandon Chase, MD

NOTE: This is 2-day workshop; participation is required for both days (April 26-27).​ ​Attendance Limit:  36

A 2015 STFM study revealed that one of the main barriers to starting a point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) curriculum in a family medicine residency was lack of trained faculty. The Contra Costa Family Medicine Ultrasound Program will offer a 2-day preconference workshop on point-of-care ultrasound. This workshop is specifically tailored for family medicine faculty and residents who are initiating or developing a point of care ultrasound program in their residency. The course will cover the basics of POCUS and can be used as a pathway to receive ultrasound privileging. Each section will be broken down into 20-minute didactics followed by a longer 1-hour lab sessions so participants can get plenty of hands on experience in use of POCUS. The preconference will cover the following aspects of POCUS, adapted for full spectrum family medicine training: cardiac, pulmonary, abdominal, renal, obstetrics, deep venous thrombosis, procedural, ocular, musculoskeletal and soft tissue. Participants will receive a course manual, CME from STFM and a course completion certificate.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. have POCUS skills that will allow them to improve clinical outcomes and procedural competency, facilitate more rapid diagnoses, and shorten time to definitive treatment,
  2. receive certification that can provide a pathway to credentialing and privileging for use of point of care ultrasound at their home institution,
  3. develop a curriculum and become a faculty mentor/teacher of POCUS in their residency program.

Additional Fee: $595; Fee includes training manual, certificate, CME, healthy start breakfast, & refreshment breaks. Lunch is not included.  Space is limited to 36 registrants.


Saturday, April 27
8am–5pm

PR1: Point of Care Ultrasound for the Family Medicine Physician (PART II)

(Continued from Friday, April 26); includes healthy start breakfast, & refreshment breaks.  Lunch is not included. 

Saturday, April 27
8am–5pm
 
PR2: Achieving Equity ​i​​t​he Workforce: Exploring ​the Very Low ​a​nd Declining Rates ​o​f Black Males in Medicine
Kristin Reavis, MD; Diana Carvajal, MD, MPH; David Henderson, MD; Harry Strothers, MD, MMM; Judy Washington, MD

There is significant interest in addressing systemic inequities faced by ​u​nderrepresented in ​m​edicine (URM) ​m​inorities, specifically in academic ​f​amily ​m​edicine and more generally in the medical field at large. Black males are an important and often overlooked subgroup that has experienced a disproportionate decline in representation in medicine. This session aims to develop and facilitate frank discussions regarding diversity and race in medicine. This workshop will offer participants the ability to explore and assess the reasons for the decline in the rates of Black males in medicine and begin to identify solutions to the problem. Our aim is to engage participants across the academic medicine pipeline, to address the issues that are faced by all URMs. We will explore the impact of implicit biases, micro-aggressions, institutional racism, and other barriers to achieving success, with a focus on Black males. Attendees should come prepared to engage in fruitful discussion about the reasons for low and declining rates of Black males in medicine.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. identify the structural and systemic causes within academic institutions that contribute to inequities in medical education and the workforce.
  2. recognize and list the consequences of the lack of a diverse workforce on quality healthcare, particularly for the most vulnerable and marginalized patient populations (African American males, Native Americans, Latinos/x.)
  3. collectively develop action items and strategies to support a more inclusive, supportive, and diverse workforce; identify participants’ roles in instituting change within their organizations.

Fee: $75; Fee includes training materials, CME, healthy start breakfast, refreshment breaks, and lunch.

NOTE: Registration is free for students and residents.


Saturday, April 27
8am–3pm

 
PR3: STFM Faculty for Tomorrow Workshop for Residents
Corey Lyon, DO; Simon Griesbach, MD; Marcy Lake, DO; Timothy Graham, MD; Jennie Jarrett, PharmD, BCPS, MMedEd; Kelly Jones, MD; Cathleen Morrow, MD; Sonya Shipley, MD; Randi Sokol, MD, MPH, MMedEd

This free full-day preconference workshop, presented by the STFM Graduate Medical Education Committee, is for residents and fellows who are interested in careers in academic family medicine. The workshop will include inspiring stories from family medicine leaders, guided self-assessment, breakout sessions on key teaching and academic skills, a career-planning panel discussion, and a leadership training session. Get the knowledge and skills you need to succeed and thrive as new faculty.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:
  1. ​describe the personal and professional rewards as well as the challenges that come with being faculty in family medicine
  2. ​l​ist top pearls of clinical teaching, describe practical strategies for success in academia, give effective feedback to learners, and write a winning CV
  3. ​d​escribe the organizational structure of academic medicine and how to apply for a faculty position

No additional fee; Registration is limited to the first 100 residents and fellows. Advance registration is required.


Saturday, April 27
1–5pm

PR4: Increasing Student Choice of Family Medicine: Getting to 25 by 2030
Ashley Bentley, MBA

The eight national family medicine organizations, including STFM and the AAFP, have banded together to form a new collaborative aimed at impacting medical student choice of family medicine. The goal is for 25% of all graduates of US medical schools to match into family medicine residencies by the year 2030. Realizing success will involve impacting factors all along the continuum of education and practice. Family medicine educators have unique and crucial opportunities to impact medical students, the pipeline, and the drivers of specialty choice. Come learn how you can be involved in this collaborative and help define and refine the interventions in a learning collaborative format.

Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. describe the aim of the family medicine student choice collaborative and the drivers of specialty choice.
  2. leverage the learning community of family medicine educators to explore issues and ideas and develop solutions to try in their own institutions and communities.
  3. contribute to the knowledge and experience base of the community to impact family medicine pipeline workforce development.


Saturday, April 27
1–5pm

PR5: Dermoscopy: Expanding "Scope" of Practice and Preventing Skin Cancer Deaths
James Holt, MD; Richard Usatine, MD; Miranda Lu, MD; Alexandra Verdieck, MD

Skin disorders are one of the most common conditions encountered by family medicine physicians, who are often the first to see a skin lesion concerning for cancer. Deaths related to melanoma can be prevented by early detection and treatment. As many melanomas may lack the clinical ABCDE features, dermoscopy has proven to be a useful adjunctive tool that increases both the sensitivity and specificity of melanoma detection. Dermoscopy also improves diagnostic accuracy for basal and squamous cell carcinomas. In this hands-on preconference workshop, we will introduce dermoscopy and teach participants how to use a dermatoscope in clinical practice. Through interactive case-based sessions, participants will also learn to use the Two-Step Algorithm to diagnose unknown skin lesions and determine the need for biopsy. Biopsy techniques will be taught with a hands-on evidence-based approach that can be applied to teaching at one's home institution. Participants will leave with fundamental competence in the use of dermoscopy for early skin cancer detection, improved understanding of biopsy techniques and tools to train others at their home institution, including free apps, Dermoscopedia, free Internet resources, online and in-person courses.

​Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. demonstrate the use of a dermatoscope and explain its basic function,
  2. apply the Two-Step Algorithm in clinical practice to diagnose unknown skin lesions and determine the need for biopsy,
  3. identify and take the next steps to implement a training program in dermoscopy at their home institution.

Additional Fee: $150; Fee includes training materials, CME, & refreshment break.


Saturday, April 27
1–5pm

PR6: Learning Faculty Development Skills in Mentorship, Coaching, Scholarly Activity, and Wellness: A Toolkit for New Faculty in Family Medicine
Angela Kuznia, MD, MPH; Jamie Hill-Daniel, MD; Julie Graves, MD, MPH, PhD; Elise Morris, MD; Rahmat Na'Allah, MD, MPH; Michelle Roett, MD, MPH, FAAFP, CPE

New faculty face unique challenges navigating the multifaceted domains of medical student education, clinical care, residency training, and research. Family medicine departments often struggle to provide a comprehensive orientation for new faculty or a sustainable model for continuous faculty development. Presenters will provide a toolkit for new faculty, providing guidance on faculty development, mentorship, coaching, seeking feedback, scholarly activity, research development, advocacy, wellness and resilience. Presenters will facilitate discussions on common challenges and fundamental resources. A faculty panel will present leadership development activities, mentorship and coaching styles for seeking adequate support, take questions and offer advice, including guidance on seeking and giving feedback, establishing an academic or advocacy learning plan and agenda, research development, and creating an educator portfolio. A balanced approach to faculty life is becoming increasingly important with an increased administrative burden. Presenters will review strategies for maintaining wellness and building resilience as new family medicine faculty.

​Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. ​d​escribe the most common personal, clinical, administrative, and academic challenges identified by new faculty in family medicine, learn about family medicine advocacy, and identify national resources to support family medicine faculty
  2. ​iidentify effective mentoring and coaching concepts and styles, identify accessible opportunities for building mentoring and coaching relationships, and describe strategies for maintaining and modeling work-life balance;
  3. d​evelop relationships with other new faculty attendees through shared experiences, seek mentorship and coaching opportunities in home and outside institutions; draft an educator portfolio, and propose a faculty development plan.

Additional Fee: $150; Fee includes training materials, CME, & refreshment break.


Saturday, April 27
1–5pm

PR7: Moving from Passive Spectator to Active Participant: Teaching Approaches that Create Lasting Change in our Learners

Kathryn Fraser, PhD; Molly Clark, PhD; Thomas Koonce, MD, MPH

Teaching family medicine effectively requires a diversity of skills and approaches. Faculty are truly called to be change agents on numerous levels, dealing with complex learning needs and ethical challenges of acknowledging mistakes and failure. In medical education, we sometimes encounter resistance in learners who have been pressured not to admit failure for fear of looking weak. To set the stage for effective learning, this preconference will start with capitalizing on the work of Koonce and Zakrajsek that revives and legitimizes the lecture as an effective way to engage learners. We will present evidence-based principles for developing lectures that meet the essential criteria for learning. To address lasting change, presenters will also tackle the challenge of helping learners admit errors and use effective goal setting for lasting change using models like the Gibb’s Self-Reflection cycle. Finally, we will present various evidence based evaluation methods that focus on creating effective learning plans and thus promote lasting change in learners. With this overall approach, we will present models that encourage lifelong learning that embraces mistakes and promotes effective goal setting.

​Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:
  1. ​describe fundamental features necessary for learning to occur and how to incorporate these into lectures and teaching experiences
  2. ​utilize two methods to improve residents’ self-reflection abilities to help them manage emotions, deal with failure and set realistic learning goals. Gibb’s Reflection Cycle and John’s Model for Self-Reflection will be used to teach participants to help learners set goals
  3. ​develop three initial evaluation/assessment techniques that are geared toward developing learning goals to create lasting change.

Additional Fee: $150; Fee includes training materials, CME, & refreshment break


Saturday, April 27
1–5pm

PR8: Train the Trainers Wellness Curriculum Workshop: Three Schools Collaborate to Share Experiences and Prepare Teachers to Implement Evidence-Based Wellness Strategies for Students, Residents​, and Faculty
Joedrecka Brown Speights, MD; Christienne Alexander, MD; Catherine Pipas, MD, MPH; Tamatha Psenka, MD; Sarah Bradford, MD, CCFP; Dawn Leberknight; Alexander Chessman, MD

This experiential workshop is for physicians, administrators, nurses, residents, and students committed to improving their own health, creating a culture of wellness and implementing wellness curriculum. Presenters will overview the impact of burnout, explore factors that threaten individual and organizational wellness, discuss three schools' experiences and outcomes, demonstrate application of evidence-based strategies, and prepare participants to deliver wellness curriculum in their own institutions. Presenters introduce wellness curricula that can be adapted for all health professionals to promote personal and systems well-being. Three schools highlight pilot methods, metrics, and outcomes including burnout, perceived stress, quality of life, and mindfulness. Participants will discuss the process of change, apply wellness strategies and create an actionable plan to implement a wellness curriculum personally and in their own institution. They will have access to and adapt curriculum materials including a facilitators guide with syllabus, evaluation tools and facilitated case-based questions to engage learners and colleagues and to prompt team wellness.

​Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. ​d​escribe the impact of burnout and the need for comprehensive and evidence-based wellness programs at the level of individuals and systems
  2. ​d​iscuss three medical schools implementation, methods, evaluation, metrics and outcomes including decreased burnout, perceived stress, and increased quality of life and mindfulness
  3. ​a​pply wellness strategies and prepare to implement a case-based and evidence based wellness curriculum to foster personal and system based well-being.

Additional Fee: $150; Fee includes training materials, CME, & refreshment break.


Saturday, April 27
1–5pm

PR9: Buprenorphine Waiver Training for Family Medicine Faculty: Empowering Training Programs to Address the Opioid Epidemic

Diana Coffa, MD; Kenneth Saffier, MD; Randi Sokol, MD, MPH, MMedEd; Hannah Snyder; Louis Gianutsos, MD, MPH; Todd Mandell; Geetha Subramaniam

Participants in this free preconference workshop will receive 4 hours of in-person training and 4 hours of online training that will qualify them for a buprenorphine prescribing waiver from the DEA. Buprenorphine is a highly effective treatment for opioid use disorder, but access to this life saving treatment remains limited. In the face of the ongoing opioid epidemic, some residency programs have integrated buprenorphine into their educational and clinical services, but a lack of trained faculty members remains a barrier to universal implementation. This workshop will prepare faculty members to teach about, prescribe, and support systematic implementation of buprenorphine treatment in primary care teaching settings.

​Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to
  1. b​ecome eligible to prescribe buprenorphine by completing 4 hours of in-person and 4 hours of online training
  2. ​t​each the science behind buprenorphine’s effectiveness and guide learners in initiating and maintaining buprenorphine treatment
  3. ​d​iscuss strategies for implementing buprenorphine treatment into residency clinical practices, including strategies for effective education, documentation, practice sharing, and precepting of family medicine trainees.

No additional fee. This session is supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).


Saturday, April 27
1–5pm

PR10: Designing Programmatic Assessment That Meets Accreditation Requirements: Applying Core Principles and Approaches to Assessment of Learners in Clinical Training

Shelley Ross, PhD; Cheri Bethune; Brent Kvern

Recent changes to accreditation requirements highlight the need for revising assessment approaches in family medicine training programs to better support competency-based education and assessment. In the first half of this interactive workshop, participants will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with basic principles of assessment and assessment theory. These principles will be the foundation for the remainder of the workshop, which will focus on exploring tools for competency-based assessment and matching tools to purpose. While all educators who work with learners in family medicine have some involvement with assessment tools and process, many educators have an intrinsic, altruistic desire to generally improve their approach to teaching and assessment. This may be a desire to use tools more effectively, or it may mean getting involved in planning of assessment at a deeper level. Understanding principles and theory are crucial to this process. This session will help translate assessment principles and theories into practical day to day solutions for learner assessment, as well as offer guidance in how to design an overall programmatic assessment approach.

​Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. ​d​escribe the basic principles of assessment
  2. ​a​pply the principles of assessment of, assessment for, and assessment as learning to improve teaching, assessment, and learning
  3. ​i​mplement strategies to enhancement the assessment skills of the teachers in their home programs.

Additional Fee: $150; Fee includes training materials, CME, & refreshment break

Questions?

If you have questions about the Annual Spring Conference, contact 800.274.7928 or email stfmoffice@stfm.org

Contact Us

11400 Tomahawk Creek Parkway

Leawood, KS 66211

800.274.7928

Email: stfmoffice@stfm.org 

 

Events

May 29: #STFMChat: Monthly Twitter chat at 8pm CT

June 26: #STFMChat: Monthly Twitter chat at 8pm CT

December 5-8: Conference on Practice & Quality Improvement

 

 

Deadlines

May 31: Deadline to apply for the Faculty Instructor position for the Medical School Faculty Fundamentals Certificate Program

 

June 17: Call for presentations submission deadline for the Conference on Medical Student Education